Tagged in Smart Cities

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Green economy quiz

Green economies — as defined by the environment program at the United Nations — are low carbon, resource efficient, and socially inclusive.
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Will the new economy be a green economy?

In the early months of today’s pandemic crisis, workers headed home and businesses locked their doors. Globally, the April average of carbon dioxide emissions was 17% less this year. Now, as a new economy is taking shape, those emissions are again within 5% of last year’s levels.[1] Must business as usual lead to climate change […]
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Internet of Things (IoT) quiz

The IoT extends the scope and value of the pre-millennial internet with a vast array of endpoint devices. Endpoint sensors measure weight, temperature, volume, chemical composition, velocity, and innumerable other physical properties. Many endpoints are reached wirelessly. The IoT also connects smart phones and smart speakers, and will guide tomorrow’s transportation systems. How much have […]
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Hydroponics: Redefining the farm

In 2020, agriculture has moved farther from the traditional farm and closer to the table. For 11,000 years, farming was confined to the field, with the notable exceptions of Babylonian hanging gardens and Aztec floating gardens.[1] Then, by the 15th century, plants were being grown in controlled enclosures and, four centuries later, in greenhouses.[2] Hydroponics, the practice of growing […]
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Smart city quiz

Check your knowledge of smart cities and the Internet of Things! [watu 6]
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Report measures progress at 174 cities 9 ways

The Cities in Motion Index (CIMI) for 2019 ranks cities based on nine dimensions that enhance the quality of life for citizens.[1] In its sixth edition, the report ranks 174 cities addressing ISO 3710 (Sustainability Development of Communities – Indicators of City Service and Quality of Life):[2] Human capital Social cohesion Economy Environment Governance Urban […]
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Report shows progress toward U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

A recent report documented how more than 100 major metropolitan areas are progressing toward U.N. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Along with comparison rankings, the report shows where further action is needed to reach goals by 2030.[1] The SDGs were adopted unanimously at the United Nations in 2015. The 17 wide-ranging goals address human needs and […]
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10 ways data is making cities smarter

Smart city innovations begin with data, sometimes gathered through high-tech sensors or other inventive ways. That data is sent or retrieved (pushed by a sensor or pulled by a remote system) through a digital network. The data may be stored in a database or used real-time in computer dashboards, simple displays, and reports. In recent […]
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Renewable energy growth brings green collar opportunity

The classifications of blue collar and white collar jobs derive from the popularity of blue work shirts among factory workers, skilled tradespeople, and other laborers. White shirts, jackets, and ties have been associated with offices. In all of those workplaces, dress codes have evolved to more comfortable options. The recent designation of green collar jobs […]
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Smaller cities can be smarter cities

Skyscrapers in Shanghai and the tall tours of Dubai rise above vast, well-known smart cities. San Francisco and its nearby Silicon Valley also have the international reputation of smart technologies. Other smart cities may be less known, possibly due to their size or remote locations. Still, many now lead with smart city innovations. Efficient design […]
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Five functions for smart tags and beacons

The right technology in the right place finds misplaced assets, helps with navigation, assists customers, improves facilities use, and monitors equipment. Costs can be as low as 7 cents for a passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tag. If a range beyond 25 meters is required, active RFID tags with five-year battery-power often cost $25 or […]
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Meet the next generation of project performance tools

In 2016, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI) launched Arc Skoru Inc. to administer a new online platform for recording and comparing project performance in five categories:[1] Energy Water Waste Transportation Human Experience Today, Arc optimizes that performance in projects ranging from single buildings to entire cities. User-friendly dashboard […]
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AWARE of CDC and NIH guidelines

The Baseline Property Condition Assessments described in ASTM E2018-15 do not specify consideration of infectious disease transmission concerns. In a pandemic and post-pandemic environment, that inspection and documentation is essential.

Buildings open to the public must comply with local regulations. For best results and greatest public acceptance, any planning for building repairs and maintenance should not overlook current CDC and NIH guidelines.

Optionally, ecoPreserve's can assist with a comprehensive GBAC STAR™ Accreditation which extends beyond the building to include the goals, actions, equipment, and supplies needed to implement best practices for outbreak prevention, response, and recovery.

Tools tailored to location and need

Disaster resilience requires a select toolset, identified, adapted, or created as needed based on planning calls and inclusive workshop participation.

Business and government organizations today are confronted by threat categories that range from drought to flood, from fire to hurricane, and extend globally to pandemics and sea level rise. Threat categories are broad and diverse, but ecoPreserve and collaborating organizations design resiliency tools for specific local context.

Local needs are identified and verified. Building from that essential understanding, tools are designed, tested in pilot programs, refined, then implemented through action plans.

Today's challenges/
tomorrow's potential

ecoPreserve collaborates with major community and private organizations in optimizing the resiliency and resource efficiency of their workplaces, venues, and public spaces.

In response to ever-increasing environmental, sociopolitical, and public health challenges, we advocate for and participate in assessment and planning actions that directly address disaster preparations, recovery activities, infrastructure improvements, and smart building/city design.

Online and in-person workshops

ecoPreserve designs and leads workshops in varied formats, to achieve varied goals.

Often an event is held for skill and knowledge development, but some needs of an organization or community are better resolved through collaboration to identify requirements and to design solutions. A range of Disaster Resilience workshops are available for solutions planning and development, as well as for training and communication.

Disaster Planning and Recovery Workshops

  • Identify technical and business process gaps
  • Define stakeholders, recovery teams, and processes/functionalities necessary for operation
  • Highlight missed expectations from a data loss and recovery time perspective
  • Address compliance with regulatory agencies and industry standards
Here's how to request further information. Thank you for reaching out!

Here's how to request further information. Thank you for reaching out!

Facility Condition Report

The report is prepared in accordance with the recommendations of ASTM E2018-15, Standard Guide for Property Condition Assessments. This is a partial list of contents:

  • PHYSICAL CONDITION
    • General condition of the building, grounds, and appurtenances
    • Physical deficiencies, their significance, and suggested remedies
    • Photographs
    • Safety issues observed
  • INFECTIOUS DISEASE SPREAD POTENTIAL
  • OPPORTUNITIES
    • Potential operating efficiencies
    • Electricity and water use reductions
    • High-efficiency interior and exterior lighting
  • ORDER OF MAGNITUDE RENOVATION BUDGET
    • Recommended interior finishes
    • Construction costs

Risk Mitigation Improvements

  • IAQ
    • Airflow
    • Temperature and humidity
    • Vertical transportation (escalators and elevators)
  • HVAC EQUIPMENT
    • Settings
    • Conditions
    • Capability
    • Filtration
  • FLOORPLAN
    • Traffic patterns
  • FURNISHINGS
    • Placement for social distancing
    • Clear barriers where social distancing is not possible

Interior Elements

  • Foundation
  • Building frame and roof
  • Structural elements
    • Floors, walls, ceilings
    • Access and egress
    • Vertical transportation (escalators and elevators)
  • HVAC equipment and ductwork
  • Utilities
    • Electrical
    • Plumbing
  • Safety and fire protection

Grounds and Appurtenances

  • Façades or curtainwall
  • Topography
  • Storm water drainage
  • Paving, curbing, and parking
  • Flatwork
  • Landscaping
  • Recreational facilities
Here's how to request further information. Thank you for reaching out!

AWARE of CDC and NIH guidelines

The Baseline Property Condition Assessments described in ASTM E2018-15 do not specify consideration of infectious disease transmission concerns. In a pandemic and post-pandemic environment, that inspection and documentation is essential.

Buildings open to the public must comply with local regulations. For best results and greatest public acceptance, any planning for building repairs and maintenance should not overlook current CDC and NIH guidelines.

Optionally, ecoPreserve's can assist with a comprehensive GBAC STAR™ Accreditation which extends beyond the building to include the goals, actions, equipment, and supplies needed to implement best practices for outbreak prevention, response, and recovery.

An OPTIMIZED Assessment

Certified Sustainability Consultants on a facility assessment team can discover ways to lower energy costs. Their understanding of HVAC equipment suitability and condition along with the specifics of LED lighting retrofits can provide offsets for needed investments in upgrades and replacements.

Knowledge of water systems can bring further savings while averting water waste. It can all be part of an assessment which might otherwise overlook water fixtures and irrigation schedules.

How should a facility be ASSESSED?

A thorough facility assessment finds the issues - on the surface or below - which have a potential negative impact on the building. That brings the facility to meet building codes. Beyond that, the assessment proactively addresses the deficiencies not covered by code.

The occupants of a building benefit as the assessment reveals conditions having a potential impact on their health or safety. The assessment must not overlook those conditions, nor fail to consider the frequency and duration of occupant visits.