Posted in Smart Cities

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Growth trends accelerate the need for smarter cities

Rural populations are shifting toward urban centers worldwide. As urban populations grow, the demand for new housing and commercial space also grows. The necessary rapid expansion forces city boundaries outward more than upward. Urbanization, expanded city boundaries, and rapid growth can burden infrastructure and strain available services. Civic leaders face greater budgetary and creative challenges […]
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10 Ways to build a smarter streetlight

Within 30 years, cities will house nearly 70% of the world’s population. In the smarter cities, the Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructures will deliver wide ranging services.[1] Smart city services become more efficient and valuable as data is shared between many functions. The functions include transportation, public safety, utilities, messaging, traffic control, event management, weather […]
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Report measures progress at 174 cities 9 ways

The Cities in Motion Index (CIMI) for 2019 ranks cities based on nine dimensions that enhance the quality of life for citizens.[1] In its sixth edition, the report ranks 174 cities addressing ISO 3710 (Sustainability Development of Communities – Indicators of City Service and Quality of Life):[2] Human capital Social cohesion Economy Environment Governance Urban […]
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Organizations address smart city challenges

A London-based think tank recently surveyed city leaders and corporate executives. Survey participants were asked about smart cities. Of the 105 respondents, 76% answered that smart cities do not exist. That belief does not erase significant progress seen worldwide in leveraging technology. Whether or not the ribbon has been cut, tomorrow’s communities and workplaces are […]
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10 ways data is making cities smarter

Smart city innovations begin with data, sometimes gathered through high-tech sensors or other inventive ways. That data is sent or retrieved (pushed by a sensor or pulled by a remote system) through a digital network. The data may be stored in a database or used real-time in computer dashboards, simple displays, and reports. In recent […]
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Smaller cities can be smarter cities

Skyscrapers in Shanghai and the tall tours of Dubai rise above vast, well-known smart cities. San Francisco and its nearby Silicon Valley also have the international reputation of smart technologies. Other smart cities may be less known, possibly due to their size or remote locations. Still, many now lead with smart city innovations. Efficient design […]
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Meet the next generation of project performance tools

In 2016, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI) launched Arc Skoru Inc. to administer a new online platform for recording and comparing project performance in five categories:[1] Energy Water Waste Transportation Human Experience Today, Arc optimizes that performance in projects ranging from single buildings to entire cities. User-friendly dashboard […]
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Commitment to 100% renewable energy seen nationwide

Cities, counties, and states across the U.S. have set goals to end reliance on fossil fuels and instead to generate electricity from renewable sources. As of January 2019, 166 Ready for 100% campaigns have launched in cities, counties, and states nationwide.[1] Originally planned by the Sierra Club, Ready For 100 (RF100) is a network of local […]
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Regional coalition responds to environmental concerns

The Tampa Bay area faces significant challenges of rising sea levels. Insurance industry analysis in 2015 found Tampa/St. Petersburg to be more vulnerable to storm surge than any other U.S. metropolitan area.[1] Area sea levels were predicted to rise nearly two feet by 2100. Year-round flooding was estimated to impact the regional economy by as […]
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Why develop just one smart city?

India is developing a network of 99 smart cities. A core infrastructure will deliver smart solutions to an urban population of more than 99.6 million, achieving a clean and sustainable environment. This involves an investment of over $27 billion (203,172 Crore Rupees).[1] Already, 1,300 projects are underway.[2] Central infrastructure Seven of India’s smart cities are […]
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Denver’s Internet of Things (IoT) boosts decision-making, safety, and security

Smart City projects in Denver, Colorado are designed to work together. A growing citywide Internet of Things (IoT) monitors transportation, environmental health, weather, and freight. Varied endpoint sensors and dashboard maps are being interconnected to benefit decision-making, safety, and security. Denver’s Enterprise Data Management (EDM) system[1] supports cross-departmental, citywide functions. Its sensors gather data from […]
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What makes a Smart City smart?

Looking only at streets and buildings, it’s difficult to tell if a city is a smart city. Monorails may dart between tall glass towers that gleam in futuristic shapes. Boulevards may be wide and buffered with parkland. Is that a smart city? Maybe One shining city might deplete resources and accumulate waste, while an older […]
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AWARE of CDC and NIH guidelines

The Baseline Property Condition Assessments described in ASTM E2018-15 do not specify consideration of infectious disease transmission concerns. In a pandemic and post-pandemic environment, that inspection and documentation is essential.

Buildings open to the public must comply with local regulations. For best results and greatest public acceptance, any planning for building repairs and maintenance should not overlook current CDC and NIH guidelines.

Optionally, ecoPreserve's can assist with a comprehensive GBAC STAR™ Accreditation which extends beyond the building to include the goals, actions, equipment, and supplies needed to implement best practices for outbreak prevention, response, and recovery.

Tools tailored to location and need

Disaster resilience requires a select toolset, identified, adapted, or created as needed based on planning calls and inclusive workshop participation.

Business and government organizations today are confronted by threat categories that range from drought to flood, from fire to hurricane, and extend globally to pandemics and sea level rise. Threat categories are broad and diverse, but ecoPreserve and collaborating organizations design resiliency tools for specific local context.

Local needs are identified and verified. Building from that essential understanding, tools are designed, tested in pilot programs, refined, then implemented through action plans.

Today's challenges/
tomorrow's potential

ecoPreserve collaborates with major community and private organizations in optimizing the resiliency and resource efficiency of their workplaces, venues, and public spaces.

In response to ever-increasing environmental, sociopolitical, and public health challenges, we advocate for and participate in assessment and planning actions that directly address disaster preparations, recovery activities, infrastructure improvements, and smart building/city design.

Online and in-person workshops

ecoPreserve designs and leads workshops in varied formats, to achieve varied goals.

Often an event is held for skill and knowledge development, but some needs of an organization or community are better resolved through collaboration to identify requirements and to design solutions. A range of Disaster Resilience workshops are available for solutions planning and development, as well as for training and communication.

Disaster Planning and Recovery Workshops

  • Identify technical and business process gaps
  • Define stakeholders, recovery teams, and processes/functionalities necessary for operation
  • Highlight missed expectations from a data loss and recovery time perspective
  • Address compliance with regulatory agencies and industry standards
Here's how to request further information. Thank you for reaching out!

Here's how to request further information. Thank you for reaching out!

Facility Condition Report

The report is prepared in accordance with the recommendations of ASTM E2018-15, Standard Guide for Property Condition Assessments. This is a partial list of contents:

  • PHYSICAL CONDITION
    • General condition of the building, grounds, and appurtenances
    • Physical deficiencies, their significance, and suggested remedies
    • Photographs
    • Safety issues observed
  • INFECTIOUS DISEASE SPREAD POTENTIAL
  • OPPORTUNITIES
    • Potential operating efficiencies
    • Electricity and water use reductions
    • High-efficiency interior and exterior lighting
  • ORDER OF MAGNITUDE RENOVATION BUDGET
    • Recommended interior finishes
    • Construction costs

Risk Mitigation Improvements

  • IAQ
    • Airflow
    • Temperature and humidity
    • Vertical transportation (escalators and elevators)
  • HVAC EQUIPMENT
    • Settings
    • Conditions
    • Capability
    • Filtration
  • FLOORPLAN
    • Traffic patterns
  • FURNISHINGS
    • Placement for social distancing
    • Clear barriers where social distancing is not possible

Interior Elements

  • Foundation
  • Building frame and roof
  • Structural elements
    • Floors, walls, ceilings
    • Access and egress
    • Vertical transportation (escalators and elevators)
  • HVAC equipment and ductwork
  • Utilities
    • Electrical
    • Plumbing
  • Safety and fire protection

Grounds and Appurtenances

  • Façades or curtainwall
  • Topography
  • Storm water drainage
  • Paving, curbing, and parking
  • Flatwork
  • Landscaping
  • Recreational facilities
Here's how to request further information. Thank you for reaching out!

AWARE of CDC and NIH guidelines

The Baseline Property Condition Assessments described in ASTM E2018-15 do not specify consideration of infectious disease transmission concerns. In a pandemic and post-pandemic environment, that inspection and documentation is essential.

Buildings open to the public must comply with local regulations. For best results and greatest public acceptance, any planning for building repairs and maintenance should not overlook current CDC and NIH guidelines.

Optionally, ecoPreserve's can assist with a comprehensive GBAC STAR™ Accreditation which extends beyond the building to include the goals, actions, equipment, and supplies needed to implement best practices for outbreak prevention, response, and recovery.

An OPTIMIZED Assessment

Certified Sustainability Consultants on a facility assessment team can discover ways to lower energy costs. Their understanding of HVAC equipment suitability and condition along with the specifics of LED lighting retrofits can provide offsets for needed investments in upgrades and replacements.

Knowledge of water systems can bring further savings while averting water waste. It can all be part of an assessment which might otherwise overlook water fixtures and irrigation schedules.

How should a facility be ASSESSED?

A thorough facility assessment finds the issues - on the surface or below - which have a potential negative impact on the building. That brings the facility to meet building codes. Beyond that, the assessment proactively addresses the deficiencies not covered by code.

The occupants of a building benefit as the assessment reveals conditions having a potential impact on their health or safety. The assessment must not overlook those conditions, nor fail to consider the frequency and duration of occupant visits.